sovay: (Rotwang)
[personal profile] sovay
Happy autumn! Happy Bi Visibility Day! Happy centenary of the invention of Fluff, which explains why the first thing I ate today was a peanut butter and marshmallow fluff cookie: I spent the later part of my afternoon in Union Square with [personal profile] rushthatspeaks, [personal profile] gaudior, and Fox, who may or may not have liked their first taste of marshmallow but was really into a crunchy organic juice blend one of their parents was trying to drink. (Eventually they covered themselves in it. It was green. That's the first time I've seen a baby cosplay Howl's Moving Castle.) I am delighted to learn that plasmodial slime molds can share memories. I would definitely watch Dwayne Johnson as Plato. I am faceplantingly tired, but I have cats. It has not been terrible, being awake today.

Hummingbird Grooming

Sep. 23rd, 2017 07:05 pm
yourlibrarian: BeautifulDay-no_apologies_86 (SPN-BeautifulDay-no_apologies_86)
[personal profile] yourlibrarian posting in [community profile] common_nature
Yes, some more hummingbird pics. Do you wonder how this hummingbird achieves its bedhead look? Why with a rather long (for a hummingbird) grooming session!

Read more... )
destina: (other: thought cloud)
[personal profile] destina
I have six stories sitting in drafts on AO3 to be posted - two of them brand new - and they've been languishing there for weeks because I can't think of titles or summaries for them. Untitled by Destina - Doc and Wyatt get it on is not a particularly enticing gateway to my Tombstone story. What about Untitled by Destina - hey I wrote this Sinclair/Garibaldi story 12 years ago and never posted it, so you'd think I'd have thought of a great summary for it since then, wouldn't you? Sigh.

But I did post some other stuff. It's fascinating, what one finds when one goes combing through one's LJ for untitled stories and comment fic and leftover things I used to worry about people liking. I'm rolling my eyes at myself. It's a blue light special, everything must get posted, even that one Bradley/Colin fic I wrote and am...was... embarrassed by. (It doesn't have a title either, poor thing; I have to think of one by October 22 or it will vanish forever from drafts.)

Anyway, here's the stuff I did manage to make up titles for, hah! -

No Longer Bound To Rome - The Eagle, Marcus/Esca, 2,497 words.

Transparent - Merlin, the knights and Merlin, gen, 2,064 words.

Virtue - Merlin, Arthur/Merlin, 560 words.

Unexpected - Penny Dreadful, Dorian/Ethan, 602 words.

In other news, it's the most wonderful time of the year! No, I'm not talking about Yuletide, tho I guess that's okay too; I'm talking about PUMPKIN FLAVORED EVERYTHING OMG at Trader Joe's! I took my first baby steps in the New! Delightful! Pumpkiny Things! pool of treasures there today, and grabbed up some dark chocolate covered pumpkin spice granola topped with toasted pumpkin seeds, and oh yeah, it's as great as it sounds. Yaaaay pumpkin season!

Washington Whizzers: 1941

Sep. 23rd, 2017 09:49 pm
[syndicated profile] shorpy_feed

Posted by Dave

May 1941. Washington, D.C. "Rent a bicycle -- Sunday recreation at the Tidal Basin." Medium format negative by Martha McMillan Roberts. View full size.

The 13th-Century Revolution.

Sep. 23rd, 2017 10:29 pm
[syndicated profile] languagehat_feed

Posted by languagehat

Eric Weiskott describes “the 13th-century revolution that made modern poetry possible” — namely, the change from alliterative verse (“the form of poetry used in Beowulf, Piers Plowman, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight”) to the accentual-syllabic meters that underlie what we think of as traditional English verse, which began around the end of the 12th century. Weiskott gives as an example “the opening lines of the Ormulum, a very long religious tract composed by a monk named Orm”:

Thiss boc iss nemmnedd Orrmulum
forrthi þatt Orrm itt wrohhte
(‘This book is called Ormulum because Orm wrote it.’)

(Gotta love both the spelling and the impeccable reasoning.) I liked the apposite Pound quote (“To break the pentameter, that was the first heave”) and this interesting paragraph:

So if alliterative metre doesn’t measure stresses, syllables or even alliteration, what does it measure? Scholars have been debating the answer to this question since the 18th century. Current thinking is that alliterative metre measures a more abstract unit termed metrical position. A metrical position might contain one syllable, or it might contain more than one. Specifically, any number of adjacent unstressed syllables count together as a single metrical position. So, for example, the run of three unstressed syllables in the second half of the line from Piers Plowman, –e was the, is formally equivalent to the run of two unstressed syllables at the beginning of the line, in a. That’s right: a metre in which 1 + 1 = 3. In Beowulf, the rule is fairly simple: four metrical positions make a verse. By the time of Piers Plowman, the arrangement of positions had got more complicated.

Thanks, Jack!

Photo Sharing: 1960

Sep. 23rd, 2017 07:26 pm
[syndicated profile] shorpy_feed

Posted by Cazzorla

A slide from a collection I purchased at the swap meet a few years back. They had belonged to an Air Force sergeant and his wife and dated from the 1950s to the 1970s; this one was marked May 1960. View full size.

Urban Infrastructure: 1941

Sep. 23rd, 2017 04:07 pm
[syndicated profile] shorpy_feed

Posted by Dave

July 1941. "Work on streetcar tracks, Fourteenth and G Streets N.W., Washington, D.C." Medium format negative by Martha McMillan Roberts. View full size.

Out For the Weekend

Sep. 23rd, 2017 03:54 pm
[personal profile] aly_ram_98 posting in [community profile] findthatbook
Im looking for a book that has a bunch of short stories. I sadly only remember one short story in it. It was a supernatural type of short story book. I read it in the YA section about 6 years ago. The short story I remember I believe was one of the first stories in it. I don't remember much, but i remember for sure that it was about a vampire who owned an old movie theater. He would microwave his blood in the office and he would walk around the theater. I believe there was a girl in the theater who wirked there, and I'm pretty sure there was some romance in it as well. I can't remember that much about it, but I know the movie theater thing was for sure, which I hope narrows it down since there's not many like that. It was a short story that was one of the first stories in the book. I hope I can find it. :)
james_davis_nicoll: (Default)
[personal profile] james_davis_nicoll
Which is creating the Amazon and Chapters links for the book being review, I know one particular book is $19.19 if you buy it from Kobo and $11.71 from Kindle....

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